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Call For Papers Details

Authors interested in submitting papers are advised to check the Paper Author Resource Page and read Requirements for Submitting Papers. Authors submitting papers in response to this Call for Papers should submit full papers for peer review to the Transportation Research Board online at www.TRB.org/AnnualMeeting. Paper submission is open from June to August 1. The paper submission website will close when it is no longer August 1 anywhere in the world. When submitting please indicate the Call for Papers title if you want your paper to be associated with a call. Note that this will not affect your chances of acceptance. Please contact the Call for Papers organizer if you need additional information.

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Call For Paper Title
A Life-oriented Approach to Understanding Young People’s Activity-Travel Behavior
Call Description

Transport policy makers need to better understand people’s decisions on their life choices and travel behavior. This call focuses on young people. They have been studied in many non-transportation disciplines over years; however, relevant studies in transportation are limited and as a result, there are various unknowns about them. The followings are some examples.

  • Car ownership: Is it really true that more and more young people (mainly in developed countries) have been losing interests in owning a car, by comparing to their parents’ generations? How to understand their decisions on car ownership in a better way?
  • Car-sharing, bicycle-sharing, and mobility management: If more and more young people dislike cars, it is expected that those young people may more prefer car-sharing and/or bicycle-sharing, and persuading them to give up owning a car or reducing the use of it under the framework of mobility management might be much easier. This is, however, unclear.
  • Migration and travel behavior: How young people’s migration, residential and job mobilities affects their travel behavior (including car ownership)? How different of such mobilities and behaviors of young people in the present and in the past?
  • Built environment and activity-travel behavior: It is expected that young people may spend more time on out-of-home social activities. In such a case, how important of residential environment to young people’s residential location and travel choices?
  • Lifestyle and travel behavior: How to encourage young people to form healthy, environmentally friendly, and/or safety-conscious lifestyles, and how the resulting lifestyle changes affect their travel behavior?
  • ICT, social network, and activity-travel scheduling: In recent years, young people are more likely to rely on various social media such as Facebook and LINE. How the development of information and communication technologies (ICT) leads to changes in the formation of and communications within their social networks as well as their lifestyles? How such changes affect their time use and activity-travel scheduling behavior?
  • Subjective well-being and travel behavior: Are there any differences between young people and others, and why? How to reflect such differences in the provision of transport services and policy decisions?

It seems that most transportation studies have only focused on young people’s travel behavior itself and ignored the role of life-related factors in determining their travel behavior or differentiating their behaviors from other generations. In line with this consideration, we would like to call for papers that deal with the above topics in the context of not only developed counties, but also developing countries, based on the life-oriented approach. The life-oriented approach argues that people’s life choices in various domains (e.g., residence, neighborhood, health, education, work, family life, leisure and recreation, finance, and travel behavior) are interdependent. For travel behavior, it further argues that travel may not only result from various life choices, but also affect them, to which people’s quality of life is largely attributable. 

Other related topics and studies in the broader area of understanding and modelling time use and activity patterns are also of interest to the committee and welcome for submission for presentation and publication.

Authors who submit papers in response to this call are requested to send the paper number and abstract to Prof. Junyi Zhang (zjy@hiroshima-u.ac.jp), Dr. Juan Antonio Carrasco (j.carrasco@udec.cl) and Dr. Karthik Konduri (kkonduri@engr.uconn.edu) by August 4, 2017.

Other related topics and studies in the broader area of understanding and modelling time use and activity patterns are also of interest to the committee and welcome for submission for presentation and publication.

Authors who submit papers in response to this call are requested to send the paper number and abstract to Prof. Junyi Zhang (zjy@hiroshima-u.ac.jp), Dr. Juan Antonio Carrasco (j.carrasco@udec.cl) and Dr. Karthik Konduri (kkonduri@engr.uconn.edu) by August 4, 2017.

Organizer Name
Prof. Junyi Zhang
Organizer Email
Primary Sponsoring Committee
Standing Committee on Traveler Behavior and Values (Changed to AEP30 on 4/15/2020)
Secondary Sponsoring Committees or Subcommittees

AEP30(1) - Subcommittee on Time Use and Activity Patterns

Primary Subject Area
Data and Information Technology
Secondary Subject Areas

None

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