January 7-11, 2018
Washington, D.C.
TRB 97th Annual Meeting
112

Hands-on Tools for Assessing Travel Demand, Energy, and Environmental Impacts of Emerging Mobility Technologies

Sunday, January 07, 2018, 9:00 AM-12:00 PM, Convention Center
Paul Leiby, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, presiding
Sponsored by Standing Committee on Transportation Energy; Integrated Transportation and Land Use Modeling Joint Subcommittee of ADB40, ADD30; Standing Committee on Transportation and Air Quality; Subcommittee on Energy and Demand Implications of Connected and Automated Vehicles; and Standing Committee on Alternative Transportation Fuels and Technologies

This hands-on workshop features demonstrations of and training on selected new transportation modeling tools for assessing the impacts of emerging mobility technologies including connectivity, automation, and mobility services. Speakers will introduce various modeling packages, highlighting their strengths, weaknesses, and target use cases. Participants will break into smaller groups, each offering hands-on training and building of confidence in one of the packages. Training will involve scenario exploration via the models’ user interfaces, followed by some small edits to the underlying model code. Featured tools will include POLARIS and BEAM for dynamic travel simulation and MA3T and ADOPT for advanced technology adoption modeling.

Welcome, Workshop Goals & Structure, Introductions
Paul Leiby, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

 

Overview of Models for Dynamic Travel Simulation
Joshua Auld, Argonne National Laboratory; Colin Sheppard, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 

Overview of Models of Advanced Technology Adoption
Zhenhong Lin, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Marc Melaina, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

 

Small group training: ADOPT
Marc Melaina, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Small group training: BEAM
Colin Sheppard, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Small group training: MA3T
Zhenhong Lin, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Small group training: POLARIS
Joshua Auld, Argonne National Laboratory